Thanks to you... and your visits & purchases, OYB can promote lore 24/7!

Magazine
General
Bikes
Boats
Skis
Motors
Adventure
ProjectGadget
Animals
Garden
Travel
Culture
Art
Reading
Thinking
Food/Health
Music
Hook'n'Bullet

Catalog
Mag Issues/Sub
Biking
Skiing
Boating
Literature
Philosophy
Bumperstickers
Music/Video
OYB Luggage
Shipping Policy
Non-US Postage

Services
BookWorld
MusicWorld
VideoWorld
Sponsors

OYB Forums
OYB Email List
LazyGal Art /Mrs. OYB
Links to OYB Faves
Contact
Ship/Return Policy
OYB Homepage

OYB eBay Store!
OYB Facebook!
OYB Twitter!
OYB MySpace!

Like OYB? Shop OYB!
...Or donate! Thanks!

Search Now:  
 
Using above link for your Amazoning really helps OYB!
Home > Magazine > Reading > Flann O'Brien: Great, Hilarious Irish Writer

Flann O'Brien: Great, Hilarious Irish Writer
January 28, 2010

Here's a guy who wrote some comic novels that you gotta read. "The Third Policeman" and "At Swim Two Birds" are musts. "The Poor Mouth" is close behind.

"The Third Policeman" features the essence of bicycles and even has them come to life in the way that bikes would: sneakily. And anyone who's ridden a good bike would agree that it's "a power for the hills." He's dry but his level of blarney is unsurpassed as he unveils reality gymnastics like you haven't heard before, delivered by rustic characters.

One wee note about "At Swim Two Birds" is that it features a Gaelic hero of yore, Finn Mac Cool, who interacts with the writers of the story.

"The Poor Mouth" is a send-up of Irish culture revivalists who come from the city in search of the sweet mother tongue being spoken somewhere in the countryside. They run into a family that is poorer than poor. It rains indoors more than out and it rains outside more than anywhere else in the world. The pig is treated as kin. They're poorer than you and than you can even imagine. When you think you've seen the worst, "Oh, that's nothin'..." and on we go into far-out rural parody...and cityfolk parody , too.

Here's a writer who plays gleefully and sharply with multiple storylines and realities. He includes and epitomizes the Irish way -- and its heritage -- yet also sends it up continuously. It's like James Joyce that you can easily read. Heck, he created a wonderful world in footnotes decades before today's McSweeneyites made their lame attempts.

This reviewer says he was postmodern before it was a good idea -- and he may have been spoofing it even then.

www.themodernword.com/scriptorium/obrien.html

 > Go to Website

Related Articles & Good Stuff

Views From a Wider Range of OYB